Archive for November, 2008

29
Nov
08

Aerodata International Issue 01

The RAF Station at Pembrey, a few miles west of Swansea in South Wales, was all activity as technicians both Service and civil converged on the base from all over the United Kingdom to examine the German landed an intact Focke-Wulf FW 19OA-3 after a navigational error in mistaking the Bristol Channel for the English Channel. Re-marked MP499, the machine was which the RAF had been encountering in increasing numbers were finally laid bare.
The beginnings of these designs had been made as early as 1937 when a development contract had been placed with the Focke-Wulf company of Flughafen, the resultant prototype flying two years later under the designation FW 190V1. A second prototype, the FW 190V2, flew in the autumn of 1939 and, like the V1, it originally had a ducted spinner.
Download (rapidshare.com)
Advertisements
29
Nov
08

Germany’s Secret Weapons of WWII

Before we begin to examine the large and diverse array of secret weapons produced in Germany before and during World War II, we should perhaps define what is meant by the term ‘secret’. Most weapons are developed in secret – or at least, under conditions of stringent security – whether in times of peace or war, if only because, as the old adage has it, forewarned is forearmed. In Germany’s case, there was an added imperative: the Versailles Treaty which, at the end of World War I, forbade her to develop (and even to possess) certain categories of weapons, such as aircraft and tanks. Development programmes for these weapons had to be carried out in absolute secrecy, since the ultimate risk (though probably a small one by the time these development programmes were under way) was the occupation of Germany by the victorious Allies. In many cases, up untill the moment that Hitler signalled his intention to revoke the Treaty unilaterally, the projects were actually based outside Germany: in Holland, the Soviet Union, Sweden and in particular Switzerland.
Download (rapidshare.com)
29
Nov
08

Hamlyn Guide To Military Aircraft Markings

Why are aircraft painted and given markings? Basically, to protect the airframe against corrosion, assist in concealment from an enemy and provide some form of national or unit identity. Markings were the first to appear, followed by camouflage, the latter being a derivation of the French comoufler – to disguise. Most of the color schemes have been the result of particular requirements such as for aircraft operating over certain types of terrain like the jungle or over the sea, or for special roles. Given today’s modern, high-performance combat aircraft, it would perhaps be logical to think that there is no real need for camouflage. After all, missiles are fired at targets beyond visual range, and with long distance radars it is generally accepted that the day of the close-conflict dogflight is now past. That may be so, but at low level, under the radar, a fast moving aircraft will need all the protection it can get if it is to reach its target, deliver its weapons and escape undetected.
Download (rapidshare.com)
29
Nov
08

Lancaster A Bombing Legend

You must have felt the atmosphere! A sharp-eyed youngster in the crowd spots the classic silhouette as it orbits ‘off-stage’ waiting for its cue. The initial babble of excitement is replaced by an almost religious hush at the arrival of the only airworthy Avro Lancaster on this side of the Atlantic.The proud veterans watching from the ground, some of whom will have flown half way around the world of this moment, wait for the unmistakable throb of four Merlins. Ex-grounderew members, doubtless re-living the hours they waited for ‘their’ bombers to return after a mission, go misty eyed as the memories flood back.
Download (rapidshare.com)
29
Nov
08

Ian Allan – Aircraft Illustrated Special – RAF Tornado

True to its conception as a Multi-Role Combat Aircraft, the Panavia Tornado is almost all things to all men. For three European nations it is proof that multi-national collaboration in technologics at the frontiers of science is not only possible but also can be very suecessful. For the United States it is, by the same reasoning, a warning that a lucrative market in high-tech war planes could be on the wane. For the Soviet Union it is a warning that the petty domestic and international politics which are the luxury of democracy can be swept aside when a common danger is perceived. For two Arab nations, the Tornado is a symbol of the milltary prestige and improved world status which exploitation of natural resoures can bring. For four air arms in three NATO countries it is simply the best aeroplane there is.This is not the first (nor will it be the last!) book about the Tornado. Even before the aircraft began to wear squadron badges, far larger works than this were freely able to chronicle its development history and detail the remarkable wealth of research invested in its construction, powerplant and avionics.
Download (rapidshare.com)
29
Nov
08

US Air Fore: The New Century


US Air Fore: The New Century has its roots in the book United States Military Aviation: The Air Force which was produced in 1980 by Midland in their benchmark series on ‘Military Air Arms’. However, the detailed individual aircraft histories included then have been omitted this time, in favor of a more wide-ranging review and much improved all-color illustration, made possible by advances in our production technology since the original volume.This new book sets out principally to give an overview of the organization, its equipment and roles at the beginning of the new millennium, although it also provides a brief account of the evolution of the Air Force. A huge reorganisation, begun in the aftermath ol the Gulf War, has now been implemented, enabling the Air Force to plan for the new challenges of the 21st Century. The Command Structure guides the reader through these changes, and signposts the way forward into the future.
Download (rapidshare.com)

29
Nov
08

Aeroguide Issue 01

Familiar to everybody as the aircraft used by the famous Red Arrows, the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the BAe Hawk has quickly made a name for itself as one of the most reliable and most versatile, military jets in the world today. Although essentially a trainer – with all the forgiving characteristics which that particular role demands – it is also a highly capable ground attack aircraft and can, moreover, perform as a point defence interceptor.The Hawk’s versatility stems partly from the fact that it was designed to fulfil tasks previously undertaken by two different aircraft: advanced flying training, up until the late 1970s the province of the Hawker Siddeley (Folland) Gnat; and weapons training, hitherto carried out by the Hunter.
Download (rapidshare.com)